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20090831
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 69 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the book is called the last best hope restoring conservatism and america's promise. i am pleased to have him back at this table. welcome. >> sorry you had to bring me. >> i enjoy hearing the stories about the ball girl last time here. (laughter) >> rose: how are you different today? >> you know, i think -- i think i know now in 2009 what i didn't know in 1995. >> rose: i hope so. >> and ironically, i'm counselling my liberal democratic friends, saying just relax. you know, i thought 1995 when we conservatives took over congress, we owned the world. that we could pass whatever we wanted to pass through the house. the senate would confirm it. it would go to the white house, be signed and it would be law. and what i found out was james madison was a pretty smart guy. we darted further right than america was ready to go. and you had moderate republicans and democrats in the senate. it sort of chiseled off the edges of that agenda. the same thing's happening now. and democrats have gone too far left. they spent too much money. they're moving faster than the middle of american political though
and america'sha amased to have m back at this tle. welce. >> sorry you had to bring e. >> i joy hearing the stories out the ball gi la time here. (laughter) >> rose: w are you differt today? >> you kw, i think -- i think i know now in 2009 what i dn't know in 1995. > rose: i hope so. >> and ironically, i'm counselling my liberal democratic friends, sang just relax. you know, ihought 1995 en we conservatives took over coness, we owned the world. that w could pass atever we wanteto pass through the house. the senate would confirm it. it would go tohe white house, be signednd it would be l. and what i found out was james mason was a pret smart guy. we darted further right than amica was ready to go. and you ha moderat republicans and democts in the senate. it sort ofhiseled off the edges of tt agenda. the same thing's happening now. and docrats have goneoo far left. thespent too much money. they're movi faster th the middlef american political thought is ready to go. and there learning th same lesson. >>ose: are they doing that because it is their ideaologic place or are they doi that beca
best hope storing conservatism a america promise. am pleased to have him back at th table. lcome. >> sry you had to bring m >> i eny hearing the stories abt the ball girl lastime here. (laughter) >> rose: hoare you differentoday? >> you kno ihink -- i think i know now in 2009 what i did't know in 1995. >rose: i hope so. >> and ironically,'m counselling my liberal democratic friends, sayi just relax. you know, i tought 1995 wh we conservatives took over congrs, we owned the world. that we could pass whever we wanted pass through the house. he senate would confirm it. it would go to t white ouse, be signed ad it would be law and what iound out was james madion was a pretty smart guy. we darted further right than amera was ready to go. and you had moderate republicans and democra in the senate. it sort of cseled off the edges of tha agenda. the same thing'sappening now. and demrats have gone t far left. they ent too much money. they're movingaster than the middle omerican litical thought is ready to go. and they' learning the same lesson. >> re: are they doing that because it is th
. one is how to recognize failure, two is the evolution of god. first, jim collins, one of america's best-selling authors on business and leadership and recognizing failure. >> you would think-- at least i would have thought-- that the way great enterprises fall is they back lazy. they just become sort of fat and corps lent and they never really want to do anything new or innovative anymore. and sure enough, if you do become lazy and complacent and don't do anything new anymore you will fall. that doesn't really show how the mighty fall. it's undisciplined pursuit of more. it's overreaching. it's going too far. it's doing too much. it's undiscipline big thecht. >> rose: second, robert wright, his new book authors a new perspective ond god. >> when people look at another group of people and think they can benefit from peaceful coexistence, collaboration, cooperation or just coexistence they will usually find a basis for tolerance in their religion. >> rose: and we end with an appreciation for don hewitt, the founder of "60 minutes". he died age 86. jim collins, robert wright, and ap
,000 in america? >> studying in the united states on different campuses, yes. >> rose: is there a... tell me how you're emphasizing education. >> education, we have a policy that's actually a national strategy. that is to develop countries through education with science and technology. so this is the idea of fundmental policy of china. so that's why the government has put so much emphasis on education. the government has increased its input in... that is to say has increased the government expenses for education. it's taking a larger share in terms of the budget of the country. and also vis-a-vis the g.d.p. >> rose: when you look at the united states, what is it about the united states and its growth and development to its position in the world today that you say we want to emulate that. we want to copy that. we want to be as good as they are at that. >> yeah, i think what the reform and opening up is demanding is that we need to learn from others, whatever that is good for china. so i think that's what we are... we have been trying to do since the beginning of the reform program in 1978. so tha
speech it became clear that he's not, that america is not against this. if you complain of the interventions of the forces in iran, i would say to you, don't interfere with the home affairs of other arab captioning sponsored by rose communications >> charlie: we are in cairo, in egypt for a conversation with the president of egypt, hosni mubarak. it is my ninth interview with him. he is on the eve of a visit to washington to meet with president obama and vice president biden to talk about the middle east and other issues. it is his first trip to washington since 2004. i am pleased to have him back on this program for a conversation about the region, about the issues he sees, about his rule here in egypt for 28 years. mr. president, thank you. >> thank you. >> charlie: i come to cairo and all of the talk is about you. they say is he okay, is he healthy, does he feel good. they say he's experienced tragedy. they say is he going to run again. would this be the last term for president mubarak. you say? >> i'm not looking for, if i'm going to renew another term or something
best hope: restoring conservatism and america's promise." i am pleased to have him back at this table. welcome. >> sorry you didn't bring me again. i enjoy hearing the stories about the ball girl last time here. i take her everywhere i go. she sells books. >> rose: the best ball girl we've ever had. she was good. and, boy, does she add to your show. >> oh, many i god. yeah. people always ask why mika went on the bookstore with me. she doubles the sales. and triples the size of the audience. i'm not dumb! it's like i've got any own palin nobody's there to see the old guy. they're there to see mika. >> rose: and the chemistry between the two of you. >> yeah. >> rose: good for you. let me just talk about you first. first the news. i watched your show this morning as i often watch your show. the clinton story. questions? what'd you think? why didn't he speak? he wanted to report back to the white house first? what? >> yeah, i think so. and i think it was a smart move for him. i'm confounded by some people on the right actually criticizing this operation. this is very simple. >> rose: it's
clearthat he's not, that america is not against this. if you complain ofhe intervtions of the forces in iran, i would say to you, don interfere with the hom affrs of other arab countes. like lebanon, like hamas and others. nce you complainof this external or foign interfence, so don't do it wi other countries. we are very keen. there should sbility and no stability unless weave the -- and with asst also. meeting with theuthority, with e israeli government. >> charlie: the president o egt hosni mubarak and all about the mdle east coming up. captioning sponsor by rose comnications >> charlie: ware in cairo, ingypt for a conversation with the president of ept, hosni mubarak. is my ninth interview with him. he is on the eve of a visit to washington to et with president obama and vice president biden to talk abo the middle east and other issues. it is his first tri to washinon since 2004. i am pleased to haveim back on thisrogram for aonversation about the rion, about the issues he sees,bout his rul here in egypt for8 years. mr. president, thank you >> thank you. >> charlie: i come to cairo a
, pticularly the lders of muslim countries. but with the obama speech it became cle that he's not, that america isot againsthis. if youomplain of the interventis of theforces in iran, iould say to you, don't interfere th the home affairs of otherarab countries like lebanon, like hamas and others. sincyou complain of this external or foreig interferen, so don't do it with other countries. are very keen. there should be stabity and no ability unless we havhe -- and with assist also. meeting with the autrity, with the raeli government. >>harlie: the president of egypt sni mubarak and all about theiddle east coming up. captioning sponsored b rose communitions >> charlie: we arin cairo, in egy for a conversation with the psident of egypt hosni mubarak. it imy nth interview with him. he is onthe eve of a visit washington to meet with esident obama and vice president biden to talk about thmiddle st and other issues. it is hisirst trip to washingtonince 2004. i am pleased to have him back on this proam for a conrsation abt the regio about the issues he sees, abo his re here in egypt for 28 years. mr.
is the unitestates. we have 2000 now studying in china. >> we havebout 90,000. >> rose:ou have 90,0 in america? >> studying inhe united states on different campuses, yes. >> rose: is tre a...ell me how you're emphasizing education. >> education, we have a poli that's actuall a national strategy. that is to develop countrie through ecation with scien and technology. so ts is the idea of fundmental picy of china. so that's why the government has put much emphasis on education. the government hasincreased its inpu in... that is t say has increased the government expenses for education. it's taking a larger share in terms of the budget ofhe country. and also vis-a-vis the.d.p. >> rose: when you look at t united states, what is it about the united states andts growt d development to its positi in the world today that yousay we want tomulate that. we want to copy that. weant to beas good as they are at that. >> yeah, i think wt the form and opening up iemanding is that we ne to learn om others, whater that is good for china. so i thinkhat's what we are. we have be trying to do since the beginning o
with bank of america in london and then he turned to egypt. and he was against joining the party and it was only after a long effort that he joined the party. it is not ony mind to have my son inherit me. and as well, choice election of the president is open to the population in its entirety. it is the decision of the population to elect who would represent people. it is not for me to decide that. it is the decision of the people to elect the person who they trust. who would that person be? well we have a long time. we have still two years to come. >> charlie: do you think he's ready to be president? >> i will ask him or u can ask him. don't ask me. >> charlie: you will not dissolve parliament. you will not dissolve parliament any time soon. >> there are many rumors. >> charlie: yes, that's why i ask. >> and there is freedom of speech. people say that the pairirnt this -- parliament, this or that except once a decision by the supreme constitution of the court and the more good opposition you have, the better, the more strong, the stronger our members would be. but rumors are
ates. we have 20,0 n studying i china. >> we have about 90,000. >> re: you have 90,000 in america? >> studying in the united states on different campuses, yes. >> rose: is the a... tl me how you're emphasizing education. >> educaon, we have a licy that's actlly a national strategy. that is to devop counies throug education with sence and technology. this is t idea of fundment policy of cha. so that's why the government has t so much emphasis on education. the government ha increased its put in... that is to say h increasedhe governmen expensesor education it's taking a larger share in terms of the budget of the country. and al vis-a-vishe g.d.p. >> rose: when you look the united states, what isit about the unit states and its gwth and development to its potion in the world today that you say we want to emulate that. we want to copy that. we want to be as good as they arat that. >> yea i think what the reform and opening up is demanding is that wneed to learn from others, atever that is good for china. so i think that's what were... we havbeen trying to since the beginning o the
is to provide world soft soft area, this is what america is good at and silicon valley is good at. >> that will continue, america's leadership in creating software. >> i think software is an area america will continue to lead and silicon will be at the tip of at that movement, it is a place we have excelled at, think of the products you like to use, they are mostly american, and they don't use it because it is built in america, they use it because it is the best. >> charlie: and why is that? you know, the thing is, we -- it is of course we have enormous talented people but what makes the software product work is an ability to build a business around a compelling idea. and that, while this seems obvious in america and especially silicon valley, in almost every other place if you want to build a business say how will you make money tomorrow? and silicon value think we build businesses around an idea, and then we figure out how we are going to make money and this is incribly important because if you want something to really work and something really complicated you cannot hire people
fundamentals. such as what is the nature of our economy? why do we consume so much? is america still a global leader? when you peruse the book shelves and read the op ed pages you see titles like a failure of capitalism. big government ahead. america the tarnished. now comes kurt andersen who examines how we got here and where we go in a new book, reset, how the cries kiss restore our values and renew america. it grew out of a essay he wrote in "time" magazine called the end of excess. i'm pleased to have our friend kurt andersen back at this table. >> you just saw me do a program on iraq an afghanistan. so what are your thoughts about america's efforts there and the risks that we have that afghanistan becomes a long slog as iraq became. >> it may welcome that. and that was a great show, to talk about. because i don't think as your guest said that people, americans generally understand what a -- what a large engagement afghanistan may become. i do think the fact that this obama administration, a guy who after all got elected as the anti-war candidate of the two leading democratic candidates h
important part. our part is to pvide world soft sofarea, this ishat america is good and silicon valley is good at. >> that will ntinue, america's leadershipn creating software >> i think software is a area amera will continue toead and silicowill be at the tip at tha movement, it is a place we have excelled , think of the products y like to use, th are mostly american, and they d't use it becausit is built in america, they use it because it is the best. >> charlie: and why tha you knowthe thing is, we -- it isf course we have enormous lented people but what makes the software product rks an ability to build business around a compelling idea. and th, while this seems obvious in ameri and especially silicon valley, in most every other place i you want to bud a business say how will you make money tomorrow? and silicon value thinke build busisses around an idea, and then we figu outow we are going to me money and this is incredibly important becausef you wantomething to really work and something really complicated you cannotire pele who are motivated b a paycck, they have to live and bre
's this case discussion with these student and i'm thinkingo myself what can i ink this group about america and i had a wonderful ment named bill lazier. and he alwampressed upon me yodon't have to have the answers. what you have to have is t questis. rose: my mantra. >> exactly. and if you have the questions, good answers wl come. and i thought a ieo west pointis question. theuestion s: where's america? is americat an inflecon point? and if so, which way? becae great tions athens, 500 b.c.e. rome, egyptian old kingdom, egyptian new kingdom, mians crete have fallen. so i put to the group america renewing its gatness or is th united stateof america dangerously on the cusp of fallinfrom great to good? the estion was rhetorical but the room exploded into this really remarkabl debate. there'no correlation by sector there was a lot of discussion and eat passion for the question. t the rea crical moment me at a break. chief execive of a very successf company comes up to me and hesays "i'm very intereed in the question at you asked this morning but ie be thinking about m company all morng. we've
trained, organized and equipped. >> rose: is this political will in america to do that? >> it could be, that political will could be lost if we're not careful. i think it requires us to constantly inform the american people of the criticality of this region of the world. if we were to withdraw, if we were to allow this to return to being a sanctuary for extremists, if we allowed for this thing to spre throughout the region with a nuclear arm, pakistan at risk, the potential for confrontation between two nuclear armed forces in india andd pakistan that could result, when you look at all the possibilities of leting this go, and i think that's got to be clearly made to americans, but not only americans. i mean i think nato has been woefully underrepresented in this thing. when we go to, who really has put boots on the ground and engaged, it's the brits, it's the dutch, it's the canadians. where are the others, you know, in the 28 nation. >> so that's a very important point about presidential leadership. so how do you -- how do you get them to come around? >> well, i think that we have to
. to love food in america you have the stigma of being elitist in a way. that shouldn't be the case. i think americans should appreciate food more, that way maybe we'd eat less bad food or know where our food is coming from. >> charlie: what you described is what you don't get. what's not necessary. what do you get? what's the meal? >> you tenner a very small room, you're going to get variety of can payse and then -- canape then raw fish dish. certain things that we want to sell. like we want raw dish. we want an egg dish. we want a pasta course. want fish coue. we want a meat course. those are the parameters we try to switch it upithin that. atever is st in that day, we've had -- we've been messing around with the menu, we have a short rib dish. the hard thing is, for the cooks is the menus not stayed the same but we want to change. we are constantly trying to push, not the envelope, but we're sort of add we want to change the menu. it's hard -- >> attention deficit disorder? >> when customers come in they read about some of the food items we have short rib dish or a fluke dish, one of the
that one of the things that's really extraordinary about american medicine has made america the leader and not in health care provision but in the science of medicine has to do with our academic health centers, where we train doctors from all over the world, where we do some of the most outstanding research, where we generate new findings that influence the way medicine's practiced everywhere. those values are very hard to mash because they go out into the-- throughout the globe and the progress that's being made in medicine-- which is very real and, you know, our successes in cancer care may be somewhat limited, but our successes in controlling lots of other diseases, infectious diseases and cardiovascular diseases and many others, is equally extraordinary. we need to be careful as we legislate health care reform that we don't end up shortchanging academic health centers. i run an academic health center, the sloan memorial ketting health center, and we want to treat everyone who has encountered cancer as a disease. we arere not making money. on the contrary, we lose hundreds of millio
and the one thinwe've seen about him is man who acknowledges wn thgs don't go right, missteps, he america on the job. that the greatest lesson he lear from abraham lincoln or fdr and pt of what he is learning take more nfrontational approach. hear toss mobilize the docrats and give u on the hope of bipartisan ships. >> charlie:it seems ear to 45, i may be wrong,ut looking anhaving read about this relationship he has and with lincoln that he saw lincoln as role model he waed to ulate hover so than fdr. on the other han it seems to me that you're suggestg he ma be moving to fdr, weealking out roleodels now. inerms much that's is necessar >> we thano moveowards fdr, we haven't seenvidence in the last three disale, -- da alone, even after senator kyky and hers made it clear that even if legislation didot include the public option, even if it did not include co-op or really watered down tohe point where it wasn't going to be rticularly mningful they still might not vo for it. despite all that, t president today once ain said that he woul like to work with reblican senators. there is somhingnhe
about america's role with america's role in the world, especially middle east. >> i've heard both sides, arab and israeli, only you could do it, put it on the table, i'm convinced that for it to be a comprehensive sustainable plan they have to work it out, put it on the table we should not be in the plan of putting it on the table. >>. >> rose: the head of kessler motors was scheduled to tell us about his electric car, that interview will take place later. to want, president clinton in north korea, john meacham and general tony zinni when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: bill clinton arrived in pyongyang on an unannounced visit. north korean television is reporting the former president left the country, the jailed journalists with parr were pardoned following an apology in a meter with kim jong il earlier today. the mission comes at a time of heightened tensions between washington and north korea over its nuclear program. as we tape this broadcast at 7:00 p.m., the white house has not commented on
. >> all right, funny people opens tonight. >> that's right. >> in theatres around america. >> uh-huh. >> congratulations. >> we let the canadians see it tonight too. >> how about latin america. >> we'll get to those guys. >> rose: thank you. >> thank you very much. good to see you. thank you. >> thank you for joining us. see you next time captioning sponsored by rose communications captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
reached critical mass. >> do think america is rey to makeahange andhat crifice that it has to make? >> ros right. critical mass. >i think it's...e're approaching it. we'r approaching it. but i do thi that we're... that we're smar enough as well as there's engh of us who are... have enou of a conience to do what eds to be done to sta conserving. but it's capitalist... it's capital, it's driven a capitalist system. >> rose: well, that's okay. capilism has been good to neil. >> grt. and tt might be the savioras the fa that no it costs so much pple are thinking abt it. >> rose: so what goal do you have inusic today? i mean, yu've had this extraordinaryife, csby stills gnash and young. you've had thisxtraordinary success on yr own. i don't know how you choose what for what. but do y still have goal in music or do you just simply... is what you do and it comes to you? >> my goals to respect the source,harlie, respect the source. be there for the srce. >> rose: this is ere we beg this conversation. >> that's right. be there. be ready. that's my goal. that's my number-e task. that'shat i do. >> r
there and there was a lot of money. i make the analogy, imagine america after the second world war defining marshal plan by investg in monco. >> rose: it's no only about education but museums a other institutions. yes. this is a real coeration. so you have10,000-strong university on the west bk, a major palestinnian instution. and its president has e courage to d a collaration, which is a partnship, and so thrisks are, number one, can two very different system work together to create taking, a you sa, the best of both? so it doesn't lo like a ansplant or it looks ke, you know, coca-cola b in educatio in other words, a fixed product which is sold abroa. two, can you actually compromise between the very things i such a way that you both feel-- the students wilget two drees. when they graduate, they'llet a degree from alquds and a degreerom bard. so it has to mee our expectatns and al quds' expectations. we have to workt out. the teachers tt are trained ll be trained by us and by their faculty in a collaborative way so they enter a palestinnian high school. they won't tea in the united states. so this nd o
it and having to find new ways has reached critical mass. >> i think america is ady to ma ha change and that sacrifice that it has to make? >> re: right. critical mass. > i think it's... we're approaching it. wee approaching it. but i do tnk that we're... that we're smt enough as well as there's eough of us who are... have engh of a cscience to do whatneeds to be done to srt conserving. bu it's capitalist... it' capital it's driveby a capitalist system >> rose: well, that's okay. catalism has been good to neil. >> eat. andhat might be the savio was the fact tt now it sts so much peoplare thinking about it. >> rose: so what go do you have in music today i mean,ou've had this extraordina life,rosby stills gnas and young. you've had this extraordinary success onour own. i don't know how you choose wh for what. but doou still have gos music or do y just simply... is what y do and it comes to yo >> my go is to respect the source, charlie, respect the source. be there for theource. >> rose: this iswhere we ban this conversation. >> that's right. be there. be ready that's my goal. that's m
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 69 (some duplicates have been removed)